Second Chance Animal Sanctuary, Inc.
Open Wed-Fri: 12pm - 6pm
Sat: 10am - 5pm | Sun: 12pm - 5pm
(405) 321-1915

Please Donate!

Animal carriers, food, toys, towels,
and tax-deductible cash donations.

» See Our Wish List
» Sponsor a Pet

Donate Online
Map us on Google
 

Adopt Today!

Foster Home

Feature Dog

Ricky is nicknamed "Little Ham" around here, he has quite the personality! Obviously he's big and strong, but he wouldn't mind being a lap dog if you'd let him.

Ricky has been here at Second Chance, waiting for a family, for over 2 years now. While he loves the staff here, he sure would like to have a home of his own.

Ricky has made a lot of dog friends over the years, he does have a rowdy style of play, so he'll do best with friends that are sturdy and playful. He enjoys playing with rope toys, fetch, and going for walks. His leash manners could use some work, but he does pretty well after that first bit of excitement.

Ricky is neutered, up to date on his vaccinations, current on flea/tick and heartworm prevention, and microchipped. Please contact us about his adoption fee!

 

Featured Cat

Hi there. Don't mind me. I'm just lounging in MY area enjoying the new shelves the Boy Scouts built for ME. I'm Tina, a one year old domestic shorthair. If you have a sunroom or a big window for me to lounge in, then you're my dream come true. I do come up to greet people when they come into MY area and will accept any lovin' they want to give me, but don't expect me to jump in your lap looking for lovin' - until I get to know you real well. I get along with my roommates here, so there is no problem with other furbabies. I even allow them to sun with me in MY patio.

Cats
 

Programs

Bringing a New Pet Home

So you have adopted a rescue pet! The key to helping your new dog make a successful adjustment to your home is being prepared and being patient. It can take anywhere from two days to two months for you and your pet to adjust to each other. The following tips can help ensure a smooth transition.

Supplies
Prepare the things your dog will need in advance. You'll need a collar and leash, food and water bowls, food, and, of course, some toys.

Welcome home
Try to arrange the arrival of your new dog for a weekend or when you can be home for a few days. Get to know each other and spend some quality time together. Don't forget the jealousy factor—make sure you don't neglect other pets and people in your household!

House rules
Work out your dog-care regimen in advance among the human members of your household.

  • Who will walk the dog first thing in the morning?
  • Who will feed him at night?
  • Will Fido be allowed on the couch, or won't he?
  • Where will he rest at night?
  • Are there any rooms in the house that are off-limits?

Health care
Take your new dog to the veterinarian within a week after adoption. Review the information given at the time of adoption.

Your dog gives you a lifetime of unconditional love, loyalty, and friendship. In return, she counts on you to provide her with food, water, safe shelter, regular veterinary care, exercise, companionship, and more. Take care of these 10 essentials, and you'll be assured to develop a rewarding relationship with your canine companion.


The Ten Commandments of Dog Adoptions

1. External Identification. Microchip Identification. (We take care of this for you)

2. Follow local laws for licensing your dog and vaccinating him for rabies.

3. Follow this simple rule—off property, on leash.

4. Give your dog proper protection.

5. Take your dog to the veterinarian for regular check-ups.

6. Spay or neuter your dog.

7. Give your pooch a nutritionally balanced diet, including constant access to fresh water.

8. Enroll your dog in a training class.

9. Give your dog enough exercise to keep him physically fit (but not exhausted).

10. Be loyal to and patient with your faithful companion.


Training & Discipline

Why Training Classes?
You don't need expensive classes if you are willing to invest a little time into the health and happiness of your new pet!

Dogs need order. Let your pet know from the start who is the boss. When you catch him doing something he shouldn't, don't lose your cool. Stay calm, and let him know immediately, in a disapproving voice, that he has misbehaved. Reward him with praise when he does well, too!

Sign up for a local dog obedience class, and you'll learn what a joy it is to have a well-trained dog. Also be sure to read our tip sheet on training your dog with positive reinforcement.

Housetraining
Assume your new dog is not housetrained, and work from there. Read over the housetraining information given to you at the time of adoption and contact our trainer about housetraining tips for puppies or adult dogs.

If you need assistance, email one of our trainers at trainer@secondchancenorman.com. Be consistent, and maintain a routine. A little extra effort on your part to come home straight from work each day will pay off in easier, faster housetraining.

Crating
A crate may look to you like the canine equivalent of a jail cell, but to your dog, who instinctively likes to den, it's a room of his own. It makes housetraining and obedience-training easier and saves your dog from the headache of being yelled at unnecessarily for problem behavior. Of course, you won't want to crate your dog all day or all night, or he will consider it a jail cell. Just a few, regular hours a day should be sufficient. The crate should not contain wire where his collar or paws can get caught, and should be roomy enough to allow your dog to stand up, turn around, and sit comfortably in normal posture. If you have questions about Crating, email one of our trainers at trainer@secondchancenorman.com

If a crate isn't an option, consider some sort of confinement to a dog-proofed part of your home. A portion of the kitchen or family room can serve the purpose very well. (A baby gate works perfectly.)


Let the games begin

Dogs need an active life. That means you should plan plenty of exercise and game time for your pet. Enjoy jogging or Frisbee? You can bet your dog will, too. If running around the park is too energetic for your taste, try throwing a ball or a stick, or just going for a long walk together. When you take a drive in the country or visit family and friends, bring your dog and a leash along.

A FRIEND FOR LIFE

Finally, be reasonable in your expectations. Life with you is a different experience for your new companion, so give him time to adjust. You'll soon find out that you've made a friend for life. No one will ever greet you with as much enthusiasm or provide you with as much unqualified love and loyalty as your dog will. Be patient, and you will be amply rewarded.

Contact us as soon as you have questions... but not after you are sleep deprived and frustrated. LOL

Phone: (405) 321-1915
Questions: general@secondchancenorman.com
Training Issues: trainer@secondchancenorman.com